Alright, ya’ll.  I finally did it.  I have amazing friends who support my gluten intolerance and encouraged me to make a gumbo.  I did some research, compared different recipes, but ultimately relied on what I remember of my family’s recipe.  It was delicious and they all raved about it, so I figured I’d do the world a favor and share the recipe.  😉  (Mainly because the loan officer I’m working with asked me to send it to her and once I realized how much work it took to type it all out, I figured I’d post it here for my future reference…lol)

So, you’re welcome.

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup gluten free flour

½ – ¾ cup vegetable oil

3 stalks of celery, chopped

1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped

1 white onion, chopped

3 cloves of garlic, diced

½ cup chopped green onion

1 whole chicken

2 pounds of andouille sausage (Ragin’ Cajun is my favorite!)

3 bay leaves

¼ – ½ tsp cayenne pepper

¼ – ½ tsp dried thyme

¼ – ½ tsp Tony Chachere’s Creole Seasoning (use less if you’re using a spicy sausage)

1 – 1 ½ tsp salt (always “to taste”, but I promise you’ll want this much)

1 Tbsp gumbo file powder (found in the seafood section of most grocery stores)

 

DIRECTIONS:

Put the entire, uncooked chicken in a large stock pot and cover it with water.

Bring to a rolling boil before turning the heat down to low and letting simmer until the juices from the chicken run clear (about an hour).

 

While the chicken is simmering, make your roux.

Heat ½ cup of oil in a large cast iron skillet or sauce pan over medium-high heat before adding the flour.

Once the flour hits the oil, don’t stop stirring.  Get it nice and incorporated before turning the heat down to medium-low.  Keep stirring.

Is it too thick?  Add some more oil.

Once the roux has gotten a shade or two darker than peanut butter (this should take somewhere around 40-70mins), add the onions, bell pepper, garlic and celery.  Mix well and let simmer.

(If you feel like your roux isn’t changing color, bring the heat up a bit.  If you aren’t using a cast iron skillet, you have a little more wiggle room in the temperature.  Just keep in mind, if you see any black specks AT ALL, you’re burning it and you have to start over.)

 

Pull your chicken out of the stock pot and put it on a work surface to cool.  We’ll come back to it in a bit.  Turn the heat down to low on your homemade chicken stock.

 

Give your veggies a stir, making sure they’re nice and soft and totally coated in the roux and dump them into the stock. Add the spices and the file and give it a stir.  Raise the heat and let it start to boil.

 

Use that skillet to brown up your sausage a little (or a lot…totally up to you…it’s already cooked through) and add it to the stock.

 

Now, your chicken should be cooled off a bit.  Start breaking it down, remove the skin, pull the meat off the bones, chop everything into bite sized pieces (or pull it apart with your fingers/fork and knife), and add it to the stock.  Once you make it all the way through the chicken, the stock should be up to a pretty good boil.  If so, bring the heat down to low-medium, cover it, and let it simmer for as long as you want.  I’m always like, “I totally have 4 hours to let this thing simmer!”, but usually just end up with maybe an hour…  The longer it simmers, the more robust the flavors will be.

 

Just make sure you turn the heat off on the Gumbo when you go to make your rice (especially if you’re using a rice cooker) so that way it’s not scalding hot when you serve it.  Once the Gumbo has had some time to sit, the fat from the chicken and sausage will sort of float to the top.  Feel free to spoon that off the surface, if you feel so inclined.

 

Set the table with pink Himalayan salt, fresh pepper, and a jar of Tony Chachere’s for those who like a little extra heat.

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